Classical Architecture: The Dentil

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Newly restored, an example of Australian Sandstone Georgian/ Colonial Dentils shown under the top cornice molding.

Deriving from ‘dens’ (Lat.)  meaning ‘tooth’, the ‘dentil’ has embellished and adorned many different periods and styles of cornice moldings. From romanesque design through the ages, the dentil, as opposed to it’s relative the “corbel”, serve various functions. Whilst corbels disperse some load (weight) from the stone, typically cantilevered above– transferring it back into the building– dentil’s are mostly ornamental and are, therefore, non-load bearing (non-structural) facade design elements.

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As the architectural periods varied, dentil design, for the most part, remained fairly uniform. This is exemplified by the use of dentil design elements in romanesque design also being used later in the art deco period of the 1920’s.

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Here, shown above the medium relief art deco frieze, an ‘inverted’ dentil, used to enhance visual depth in the building facade.
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An array of handcarved indents for the sandstone facade shown above.

Mason & Maker, Restoring Victoria’s Regional Heritage Stone Buildings

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Our next restoration project in Winchelsea, Victoria – an hour past Geelong. The bluestone cottage is approximately 150 years old (circa 1860) and is now used by a professional services company.

With ‘dressed’ pitched face bluestone, hammer dressed quoins and coursed random rubble, the front entrance is also adorned with a ‘celtic-themed’ centre/single pin arch; complete with springers, curved voussoirs and keystone.

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Front Entrance with Keystone Arch
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Coursed Random Squared Rubble

Stand by for more …

#workinprogress #stonerestoration #cottagerestoration #victorianrestoration